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Graffiti – Art or Not?

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Graffiti, is a form of visual communication, usually illegal, involving the unauthorized marking of public space by an individual or group. Although the common image of graffiti is a stylistic symbol or phrase spray-painted on a wall by youths making a statement, some graffiti has a different meaning.

Graffiti can be understood as antisocial behaviour performed in order to gain attention or as a form of thrill seeking, but it also can be understood as an expressive art form.

Derived from the Italian word graffio (“scratch”), graffiti (“incised inscriptions,” plural but often used as singular) has a long history. For example, markings have been found in ancient Roman ruins, in the remains of ancient Mayan cities in Central America. on rocks in Spain dating to the 16th century, and in medieval English churches.

During the 20th century, graffiti in the United States and Europe was closely associated with gangs, who used it for a variety of purposes: for identifying or claiming territory, for memorializing dead gang members in an informal “obituary,” for boasting about acts (e.g., crimes) committed by gang members, and for challenging rival gangs as a prelude to violent confrontations.

Graffiti was particularly prominent in major urban centres throughout the world, especially in the United States and Europe; common targets were subways, billboards, and walls. In the 1990s there emerged a new form of graffiti, known as “tagging,” which entailed the repeated use of a single symbol or series of symbols to mark territory. In order to attract the most attention possible, this type of graffiti usually appeared in strategically or centrally located neighbourhoods.

Great works of graffiti can beautify a neighbourhood and speak to the interests of a specific group or community. For example, the graffiti in many Hispanic neighbourhoods in the United States is quite elaborate and is regarded by many as a form of urban art.

The question of whether such work is an innovative art form or a public nuisance has aroused much debate.

Graffiti became notoriously prominent in New York City in the late 20th century. Large elaborate multi coloured graffiti created with spray paint on building walls and subway cars came to define the urban landscape. The art world’s fascination with artists who functioned outside traditional gallery channels stimulated an interest in this form of self-expression.
In the 1980s certain New York artists gained notoriety for their graffiti and parlayed this recognition into successful careers as painters represented by top galleries.

During the 1980s and ’90s many jurisdictions sought ways to eliminate and remove graffiti, fearing that it would otherwise lead to the debasement of the community. Significant resources were made available for abatement and other clean-up efforts, but some cities even introduced mural programs or “free walls” to provide legal opportunities for urban youths to express their artistic creativity.

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